loneliness

Relationships Are Key to Long-Term Health

Relationships Are Key to Long-Term Health

Since 1938, the Harvard Study of Adult Development has followed two groups of men. One is a group of 456 boys from Boston’s most troubled families and roughest neighborhoods. The other consisted of 268 Harvard College students, chosen by a professor of hygiene specifically for their potential to become healthy, well-adjusted adults. The focus of the longitudinal study has been to discern the factors that best predict a long, healthy life.

The researchers who have followed these young men have maintained a stunning 84 percent participation rate over eight decades. They have visited homes, spoken to parents and siblings, tracked medical exams, and followed marriages and careers. The study, which is currently tracking a second generation of participants, has produced a wealth of significant data. However, in a recent article published in The Wall Street Journal, director Dr. Robert Waldinger and associate director Dr. Marc Schulz pointed to the most significant contributing factor for physical health, mental health, and longevity.

The Answer to Social Isolation, Loneliness Is to Yield to the Lord

The Answer to Social Isolation, Loneliness Is to Yield to the Lord

The answer to social isolation and loneliness is not simply trying harder to do better. Rather, it is yielding our lives to the One who empowers us to serve our King with courageous unity.

Most Men Don't Have Real Friends (But Need Them)

Most Men Don't Have Real Friends (But Need Them)

According to research from Harvard Graduate School of Education, 36 percent of Americans report feeling “serious loneliness,” as do an incredible 61 percent of young adults. According to a Cigna health survey, nearly 54 percent of American adults agree with the statement, “nobody knows me well.” Isolated and glued to our screens, it’s a crisis that’s only getting worse.

Attending Religious Services Is Beneficial for One's Health

Attending Religious Services Is Beneficial for One's Health

Harvard University reported last February that “the global pandemic has deepened an epidemic of loneliness in America.”

How the Church Can Help with the Loneliness Crisis

How the Church Can Help with the Loneliness Crisis

According to some recent studies, most Americans have fewer friends and are lonelier than at any point in our nation’s history. The effects of loneliness are catastrophic. Here is how the church can help.

Relationship Minimalism? Why Downsizing Other People Won't Make You Happy

Relationship Minimalism? Why Downsizing Other People Won't Make You Happy

According to a recent piece by Sarah Logan in The Guardian, a growing number of young people are practicing “relationship minimalism.” Inspired by home organizing coaches like Marie Kondo, these mostly urban, single adults are not only clearing their lives of excess stuff; they’re tossing out people who do not "spark joy" in their lives.

Christians Should Be the Remedy to the Loneliness Epidemic

Christians Should Be the Remedy to the Loneliness Epidemic

The church has the power to stop the epidemic of loneliness. Ask God to help you deepen your connections today—then seek to be the friend to others that Jesus is to you.

Max Lucado: God Is with You, Even in Your Loneliness

Max Lucado: God Is with You, Even in Your Loneliness

Author and pastor Max Lucado recently sat down with Christian Headlines to offer encouragement to those who are struggling with loneliness during this season.

What Is God Saying in This Pandemic?

What Is God Saying in This Pandemic?

Over these past two months, I’ve concluded that none of the most important issues we face today as a culture were created by this virus. Rather, the virus exposed and accelerated issues that already mattered.

The Loneliness Pandemic: The Elderly in Icus Battle Coronavirus and Solitude

The Loneliness Pandemic: The Elderly in Icus Battle Coronavirus and Solitude

For those trapped at home during quarantine, the internet has been a window to the outside, allowing them to stay in touch with friends, loved ones, book groups and houses of worship. Video meeting apps, such as Skype and Zoom, have witnessed a boom in users since the beginning of the outbreak.

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