opinion

Clarity, Confidence, and Courage for Confusing Times

Clarity, Confidence, and Courage for Confusing Times

There are certain moments in history when it’s obvious how much the cultural ground has shifted. Cultural norms that worked before to foster social cohesion no longer suffice. Certain ideas and shared ways of thinking can no longer be taken for granted. At these “hinge points,” Christians are forced to remember who we are and to rethink our place in the overarching story of redemption. This is one of those hinge points.

Four Biblical Steps to Living with Character God Can Bless

happy couple hugging

Promoting God’s version of sexual morality is not the puritanical imposition of outdated legalism—it is showing people how to live their best lives. Imagine for a moment the difference in our culture if every person followed God’s plan for sex. Consider the difference this would make for divorce and broken homes, children born outside of marriage, and babies lost to abortion.

Post-Pandemic: Americans Are Couch Potato Addicts

Post-Pandemic: Americans Are Couch Potato Addicts

Last July, Nielsen's Streaming Meter data found that "Americans age two and older spent more than 123 billion minutes streaming video content the week of July 20, 2020." This addiction to the screen starts far too young. As I've previously noted, various medical associations, such as the American Academy of Pediatrics, strongly recommend children refrain from all TV viewing until they reach age two, and then only an hour per day until at least age five. These professionals are concerned that the tube has a negative impact on early childhood development.

The Social-Media-Examined Life Is Not the One That Sustains Us

social media apps on a phone, Clarence Thomas calls for Big Tech and social media regulations

Recently, after giving a talk on the effects of this technological age, I was asked what visions we might offer to counter the false public personas, portrayals and projections shared on social media. One suggestion I gave is to focus on the joys of everyday, ordinary life to counter the romantic notion that in order to serve God well we must “do big things” and “change the world.” The truth is that we serve God best when we love our neighbors and each other faithfully and well in whatever ways God calls us.  

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