BreakPoint

BreakPoint

When the Truth-Bearer Falls: Responding to the Revelations about Ravi Zacharias

Recently, I was asked how we should respond to cases when a Christian leader or teacher is caught in sexual misconduct. Is it possible to separate the good that they’ve done and the truth they’ve taught, the person and their sin? And, what about when the perpetrator is gone and has no further opportunity to acknowledge his sins, repent, and seek forgiveness? On a Christian worldview analysis level, to borrow a phrase popularized by Christian educator Arthur Holmes, it is important to remember that “all truth is God’s truth.” In other words, if Ravi Zacharias ever said anything true in his life, and of course he did, he was not its source but only its medium. Any truth – all truth – comes ultimately from God, outside of time or place or context.

What if What We Saw Yesterday at the Capitol Is Us?

Yesterday, when President-elect Biden said that the actions of the mob did not reflect America, I wish he were correct. But he wasn’t. We are not a moral nation. We are lawless. We are not a nation that cultivates the kinds of families able to produce good citizens. Our institutions cannot be trusted to tell us the truth or advance the good. Our leaders think and live as if wrong means are justified by preferred ends. Our churches tickle ears and indulge narcissism. Our schools build frameworks of thinking that are not only wrong, but foster confusion and division.

Unexplained Light: The Darkness Has Not Overcome it

After recently discovering evidence of light in deep space, many scientists were left puzzled and searching for logical answers to what the unexplained glow was. Perhaps, it would be easier to see God in “the heavens” He made, if we weren’t so convinced of our ability to explain everything by purely naturalistic causes or even, as some do, to dismiss all supernatural causes. Maybe our gut instinct to look upward when we encounter the unexplained is the right one. If the heavens indeed “declare the glory of God,” we’d do well to listen.

C. S. Lewis and the Coronavirus

C.S. Lewis once said that we should read three old books for every new one. I think we should read three C.S. Lewis books for every new one. He never faced the coronavirus, of course, but in the late 1940s, the world was coming to grips with another threat: nuclear annihilation. The bomb was only a few years old, and in the hands of sworn national enemies. The uncertainty of what exactly could happen, not to mention what might happen, was palpable.

J. LO and Shakira's Super Bowl 'Performance' and Our Culture's Mixed Messages

From the beginning, the sexual revolution has promised women that aggressively flaunting skin and sexuality was empowerment and that divorcing sex from marriage and procreation would be a means to freedom. In reality, it was men who got what they wanted: sexual pleasure without the burden of commitment or requirement of chivalry. For a brief moment a few years ago, it was almost as if that lie had been exposed. More and more women bravely came forward revealing how they’d been treated horrifically as “sexual objects” and such. But if Sunday’s performance is any indication, we have not learned our lesson.