Martin Luther King Jr.

LGBTQ Outlet Calls John MacArthur an 'Old White Hate Pastor' over MLK Comments

LGBTQ Outlet Calls John MacArthur an 'Old White Hate Pastor' over MLK Comments

A progressive leaning LGBT outlet recently characterized California pastor John MacArthur of Grace Community Church as an “old white hate pastor” following MacArthur's recent comments about Martin Luther King Jr.'s faith.

Would Martin Luther King Jr. Be Heard in 2024?

Would Martin Luther King Jr. Be Heard in 2024?
Today, the nation celebrates what would have been Martin Luther King Jr.’s 95th birthday. Sharon Shahid once openly wondered whether King’s famed essay, Letter from Birmingham Jail, “would have made such a lasting impression or had as powerful an impact if today’s instant communication devices existed.

Ambassador Andrew Young, Operation Hope Founder John Hope Bryant Reflect on the March on Washington 60 Years Later

Ambassador Andrew Young, Operation Hope Founder John Hope Bryant Reflect on the March on Washington 60 Years Later

August 28, 1963, will go down, for many, as the day the nation woke up to the idea of a world where racial equality could exist. It’s a day that Ambassador Andrew Young will never forget. Young, who at the time was a young man, knew that he had an assignment to do. His job was to make sure that Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was protected and served well. In an exclusive interview with Christian Headlines, Ambassador Young and his mentee, John Hope Bryant, the president, and founder of Operation Hope, reflect on the importance and impact of the March on Washington. They also discuss how essential mentorship is in moving the country forward.

“I remember the day clearly, along with how it came about,” Young said as he reflected on the March on Washington and the racial strife that led to the historic day.

Young recalled that Dr. King almost didn’t give his famous “I Have a Dream” speech because some of the leaders of the March thought he was too young. “Dr. King didn’t give his speech until late that day,” Young said.

Chuck Colson on MLK's Dream Speech

Chuck Colson on MLK's Dream Speech

The most well-known line of King’s speech is this one: “I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.” That vision has never been fully realized, and its greatest threat today is a set of ideas that purport to advance racial justice but instead oppose it. Critical Race Theory and the critical theory mood that infects so many areas of our culture, especially education and media, are all about issuing judgments about the character of entire groups of people based solely upon the color of skin.

Twenty years ago, in a commentary about this historic speech, Chuck Colson articulated why only the Christian vision of the human person can ground an understanding of human rights, universal human dignity, and value that extend to everyone. Recently, the world has learned disturbing details about King’s character and moral failures. Colson’s analysis of King’s ideas, and his call to Christians to live out of a Christian worldview, remain true and relevant today.

Dr. King's 'Dream' Speech Commemorated in Washington as 'Racially Motivated' Shooter Kills 3 in Florida

Dr. King's 'Dream' Speech Commemorated in Washington as 'Racially Motivated' Shooter Kills 3 in Florida

Dr. King’s “somebodiness” doctrine stands on the fact that every human is created in the image of God (Genesis 1:27). He “made from one man every nation of mankind to live on the face of the earth” (Acts 17:26); accordingly, “God shows no partiality” (Acts 10:34; Romans 2:11).

Nor must we: “If you show partiality, you are committing sin and are convicted by the law as transgressors” (James 2:9). Stated bluntly, racism is sin.

Here’s the problem: sinners cannot solve the problem of sin, which is why it persists. In the context of Dr. King’s speech, prejudice—an innate sense of superiority over another person or race—is an endemic result of the Fall and our “will to power” (Genesis 3:5).

We can and should legislate against it. We can and should take every practical means to minimize its existence and horrific effects. But we cannot eradicate it without the help of the God who made us.

Dr. Martin Luther King and the Nature of Law

Dr. Martin Luther King and the Nature of Law

In his memorable “Letter from the Birmingham Jail,” Martin Luther King, Jr., threw down the gauntlet in his great Civil Rights crusade when he refused to obey what he regarded as an immoral man-made law that did not match up with the law of God.

The Intersection of Martin Luther King Jr. Day and National Religious Freedom Day

The Intersection of Martin Luther King Jr. Day and National Religious Freedom Day

Just as our nation urgently needed (and needs) a civil rights movement to advance equality for all Americans, so too do we need a spiritual movement to advance morality for all Americans.

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