prolife

A Game Plan for After Roe: Preparing for the Future by Understanding What Has Happened to Us

A Game Plan for After Roe: Preparing for the Future by Understanding What Has Happened to Us

Abortion treats pregnancy as a disease. Instead of accommodating women’s natural capacity for childbearing and, often, natural desire for childrearing, a culture that permits abortion encourages women to behave like career-focused men. Just as infuriating, abortion “allows men to view women as always sexually available without any marital commitment or promise of stability.” Therefore, abortion on demand has distorted relations between the sexes. It convinces men that an unexpected pregnancy is not only a problem but specifically a woman’s problem. 

I Believe in the Sanctity of Life, but Don't Agree with the Overturning of Roe v. Wade

I Believe in the Sanctity of Life, but Don't Agree with the Overturning of Roe v. Wade

Forcing births without support is not pro-life, forcing our beliefs on others and causing them suffering is not pro-life, and putting mothers' lives at stake is not pro-life. I may not agree with people's decisions to get an abortion. But overturning Roe v. Wade was not the way to accomplish what we want: a world where all lives are upheld as precious in the sight of God.

The Disparity Antiracists Don't Talk About

The Disparity Antiracists Don't Talk About

Disparities can have multiple factors. In the case of the high number of abortions of black babies, as we’ve shared on Breakpoint before, almost 80% of Planned Parenthood’s clinics, according to a 2012 study, were near majority black or Hispanic neighborhoods. Pro-abortion advocates argue that the racial disparity for abortion is more about poverty. Perhaps, for example, the mother couldn’t afford to care for another baby. According to Jason Riley in the Wall Street Journal, however, this argument fails to explain why the abortion numbers among Hispanics who are impoverished are not comparable.

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