More Spending Won't Improve Education System

Cal Thomas | Syndicated columnist | Wednesday, April 25, 2001

More Spending Won't Improve Education System

Congress is back in town, which means none of our wallets are safe.

Senate Democrats want to increase education spending by $13.9 billion. President Bush's plan would boost spending on education by $1.9 billion and include a character education component.

As I have often said, there is no connection between spending and learning. Washington, D.C., schools are a perfect example.

The latest national "report card on education" indicates D.C. public school students had the second-lowest scores on three standardized tests. This, despite the fact that the city is spending more per pupil than the national average.

During the 1998-99 school years, the District of Columbia spent $8,055 per student, compared to a national average of $6,251. Nearby Maryland, which spent $7,059 per student, ranked 24th, and Virginia, which spent $6,044 per student, ranked 27th.

It isn't the money. It's what is being taught and parental involvement. More spending won't solve the problem. It will only give politicians more power.