Supreme Court to Hear Case of Christian-Owned Pharmacy's Refusal to Sell Abortion-Inducing Drugs

Amanda Casanova | Religion Today Contributing Writer | Friday, April 15, 2016

Supreme Court to Hear Case of Christian-Owned Pharmacy's Refusal to Sell Abortion-Inducing Drugs


The U.S. Supreme Court is expected to decide today whether to hear a case on a Christian-owned pharmacy and their refusal to stock and sell abortion-inducing drugs.

 

Ralph’s Thriftway, owned by the Stormans, petitioned the High Court in January to review the case after the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit reversed a district court decision.

 

The Stormans say that a Supreme Court ruling in 1993 protects them. The ruling says that states may not pass laws prohibiting people from engaging (or refusing to engage) in conduct for religious reasons.

 

"If the 9th Circuit decision stands, it will be the first time in America's history that we have forced healthcare providers to participate in taking human life...[and] that is groundbreaking,'' said Kristen Waggonner, Alliance Defending Freedom (ADF) attorney and the Stormans' lead counsel.

 

According to ChristianityToday.com, the executive director of Planned Parenthood’s Washington office met with the then-governor of the state to “adopt a rule targeting people of faith.”

 

Pro-abortion supporters reportedly sent test shoppers into the Ralph’s Thriftway asking for Plan B, and filed complaints when the store couldn’t provide it.

 

That led to an investigation and the Stormans were threatened with losing their license. They then filed suit against the state.

 

"The government shouldn't be in a position where they are allowed to make a law that forces us to choose between our family business and our faith,” the Stormans said in a statement.

 

 

Publication date: April 15, 2016

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