Traditional Marriage Supporters: Court Set Dangerous Precedent

Religion Today

Traditional Marriage Supporters: Court Set Dangerous Precedent


The U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday essentially legalized gay marriage in California after ruling that defenders of Proposition 8, the voter-approved amendment defining marriage as being between a man and woman, had no legal standing to defend it. Backers of Prop 8 say the court has set a dangerous precedent that in effect neutralizes the will of the people who vote, CBN News reports. "The definition of marriage should be left to the people. When the people validly enact a law to limit marriage to one man and one woman, it should be the people who decide whether that law should be reversed," said attorney Robert Tyler of Advocates for Faith and Freedom. Karen Kenney of the San Fernando Valley Patriots called Wednesday's ruling a new kind of tyranny in which the courts advocate social justice over social structure and social traditions and standards. Brad Dacus, president of the Pacific Justice Institute, said: "If someone doesn't like a proposition that has passed in the state of California, arguably, all they would have to do, is find one judge, one federal judge to declare it unconstitutional, and then to get a wink and nod from the attorney general and the governor, and it's over. I think that's a terrible, terrible situation to have for the voters -- to have their votes count -- and to have their votes respected in a proper system." It will take at least 25 days before the Supreme Court's ruling becomes official and gay marriages resume in California. If supporters of Proposition 8 ask for a re-hearing, then gay marriages may still be barred beyond the 25-day period.

Comments

Top 25 Topics

PARTNER SITE FEATURES