68 Percent of White Evangelicals Believe the U.S. Has No Responsibility to Accept Refugees, Pew Study Finds

Will Maule | ChristianHeadlines.com Contributor | Wednesday, July 10, 2019
68 Percent of White Evangelicals Believe the U.S. Has No Responsibility to Accept Refugees, Pew Study Finds

68 Percent of White Evangelicals Believe the U.S. Has No Responsibility to Accept Refugees, Pew Study Finds


A new study conducted by the Pew Research Center indicates that an increasingly large proportion of evangelicals believe that the United States government has zero responsibility to care for refugees. 

The data is extremely damning – some 68% of white evangelicals assert that “the U.S. does not have a responsibility to accept refugees,” according to Pew. What’s even more staggering is that, among religiously unaffiliated adults, the percentages are almost the exact reverse. 

So, of those with no faith whatsoever, roughly 65% believe that the U.S. has a responsibility to care for refugees, while 31% say it does not. 

Peter Wehner, an author and senior fellow at conservative think tank, the Ethics and Public Policy Center, called the concerning figures “an indictment of white evangelicals.”

“Only a *quarter* believe the U.S. has a responsibility to accept refugees. We can debate how many refugees America should accept, but how does that general attitude align with the ethic of Jesus?” he noted on Twitter.

“Terrible. Just terrible,” added National Review Institute fellow, David French. “We can certainly argue about how many refugees our nation should accept, but to say that we have no responsibility at all? Awful.”

Russell Moore, the President of the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission of the Southern Baptist Convention, has consistently pleaded with evangelicals to seriously consider the Biblical mandate on caring for the vulnerable – he has also made fierce warnings against elevating political affiliation above the call to serve Christ and others.

“A religious right that is not able to tie public action and cultural concern to a theology of Gospel and mission will die, and will deserve to die,” he said, prior to the 2016 election. 

“When Christianity is seen as a political project in search of a gospel useful enough to advance its worldly agenda, it will end up pleasing those who make politics primary, while losing those who believe the Gospel.”

Photo courtesy: Getty Images/Best Green Screen, this is a stock photo.