Poll: Americans Trust NPR and PBS, but Don’t Trust Fox and MSNBC

Poll: Americans Trust NPR and PBS, but Don’t Trust Fox and MSNBC

Poll: Americans Trust NPR and PBS, but Don’t Trust Fox and MSNBC


Americans say NPR, the Associated Press, PBS and The Wall Street Journal are the most accurate and unbiased news sources while MSNBC and Fox News are among the least accurate and most biased, according to a new survey and report by Gallup and the Knight Foundation.

Not surprisingly, there is a major divide between Democrats and Republicans on the issue.

“Americans perceive much bias and inaccuracy in news reporting and are generally bothered by its presence, even when the bias or inaccuracy is against groups they oppose,” said the report’s conclusion. “They generally believe there is more bias than inaccuracy in news reporting today, both in traditional news media and on social media.”

American adults rated five news organizations as mostly accurate and unbiased: AP, PBS, The Wall Street Journal, USA Today and CBS. Meanwhile, six news organizations were rated as mostly inaccurate and biased: MSNBC, Fox, Vox, The Huffington Post, Breitbart News and Mother Jones. According to the report, CNN is “perceived as biased, but the public is divided on whether it is accurate or inaccurate.”

But Republicans and Democrats view new media very differently. Republicans consider only two news organizations – Fox and The Wall Street Journal – accurate and unbiased. For Democrats, the list includes 12 media outlets, including all the major networks – minus Fox, which Democrats label inaccurate and biased.

“Having more choices also means having a greater ability to get a one-sided view of the news,” read the report’s conclusion. “Those who get news mostly from conservative-leaning sources appear especially likely to perceive inaccuracy and bias in the news. Those who primarily rely on liberal-leaning sources are especially bothered by perceived inaccuracy.”

 

Michael Foust is a freelance writer. Visit his blog, MichaelFoust.com.

Photo courtesy: ©Thinkstock/keport

Publication date: June 27, 2018