Growing Number of Americans Value Relationships, Hobbies, Money over Religion: Survey

Amanda Casanova | ChristianHeadlines.com Contributor | Updated: Jul 25, 2023
Growing Number of Americans Value Relationships, Hobbies, Money over Religion: Survey

Growing Number of Americans Value Relationships, Hobbies, Money over Religion: Survey

A new Gallup survey found that Americans are now ranking community activities, hobbies, recreational activities, money, friends, and health as "extremely or very important" priorities in their lives.

Family remains the highest priority of all, while the importance of religion has fallen over the past 20 years, The Christian Post reports.

Of those surveyed, 96 percent ranked family as extremely or very important. The same number said the same in a 2001 and 2002 survey.

Meanwhile, religion fell as an extremely or very important priority by 7 percent, from 65 percent to 58 percent.

Notably, community activities have jumped in priority among Americans. In the most recent survey, 55 percent said those were important compared to 32 percent in a 2002 survey.

Hobbies and recreational activities also jumped in priority over the years by 13 percent. Money increased from 67 percent to 79 percent; work increased from 74 percent to 83 percent; the priority placed on friends increased from 74 percent to 78 percent, while the focus on health also increased by 2 percent.

"Somewhere along the way, Americans' personal priorities have shifted in notable ways. They now value parts of their lives more than they did in 2001-2002, particularly their community activities, but also their hobbies and recreational pursuits, their money, and their jobs," said Lydia Saad, director of U.S. social research at Gallup.

Many recent studies have pointed to a decline in religion as a priority among Americans.

In the 2018 "Meaning in Modern America" study, Institute for Family Studies psychology professor Clay Routledge discussed how most Americans, including those who believe in God, said their main source of meaning in life comes from their relationships with others, such as family and friends and not religion.

"American culture is changing in a number of ways that have potentially powerful implications for people's efforts to find and maintain meaning in life. Americans are waiting longer to get married and have children, and are having fewer children," Routledge said. "Feelings of social disconnection and loneliness are on the rise, even as people are increasingly 'connected' via social media."

Photo courtesy: Unsplash/Priscilla Du Preez 


Amanda Casanova is a writer living in Dallas, Texas. She has covered news for ChristianHeadlines.com since 2014. She has also contributed to The Houston Chronicle, U.S. News and World Report and IBelieve.com. She blogs at The Migraine Runner.



Growing Number of Americans Value Relationships, Hobbies, Money over Religion: Survey