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Two NYC Siblings Use Their Christmas Tree Business to Help the Homeless

Veronica Neffinger | Editor, ChristianHeadlines.com | Tuesday, December 27, 2016
Two NYC Siblings Use Their Christmas Tree Business to Help the Homeless

Two NYC Siblings Use Their Christmas Tree Business to Help the Homeless


Two young business owners in New York City have decided to use their Christmas tree business to help those in need this holiday season.

Siblings Dan and Morgan Sevigny are the founders of Christmas Tree Brooklyn, a company that delivers Christmas trees to homes and businesses as well as picks up discarded trees after Christmas for a fee of $49.

The Sevigny siblings say that many people and businesses make use of their services because they not only deliver or pick up Christmas trees, they clean up after transporting the trees.

According to The Huffington Post, this year the Sevignys wanted to use their business to do more for their community so they decided to partner with Covenant House, a homeless shelter for young adults which provides basic necessities for those in need.

First, they donated a Christmas tree to Covenant House for residents to enjoy.

Some of the young adults at the shelter touched a real Christmas tree for the first time in their lives.

“It feels warm, comfortable,” 18-year-old Destiny told Fox News. “I feel like it’s home.”

Christmas Tree Brooklyn is also offering to pick up items such as food, clothes, and toys when they pick up discarded Christmas trees and take these needed items to Covenant House. Thus far, they have raised almost $20,000 worth of goods for the shelter.

“It’s so important to help those in need in your community,” Dan Sevigny told The Huffington Post. “And this is such an easy way to do that.”

The Sevignys also seek to help the environment through their business. They take discarded trees to mulching events where they are recycled.

“We grew up in a national park in Maine,” Sevigny said. “So we’ve always had a strong sense of environmental responsibility.”

 

Photo courtesy: Thinkstockphotos.com

Publication date: December 27, 2016

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