Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine Is Approved for Emergency Use in the U.S.

Amanda Casanova | ChristianHeadlines.com Contributor | Monday, December 21, 2020
Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine Is Approved for Emergency Use in the U.S.

Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine Is Approved for Emergency Use in the U.S.


Shipments from the second COVID-19 vaccine left a distribution center Sunday with early doses expected to start this week.

The second developed vaccine is from Moderna Inc. and the National Institutes of Health and is being shipped by FedEx.

“The shipment of vaccines to help end the COVID-19 pandemic is among the most important work in the history of FedEx, and our team is focused on the safe and efficient delivery of these critical shipments,” Raj Subramaniam, president and COO of FedEx, said in a statement. “As we have said since the onset of the pandemic and our relief efforts, this is who we are and what we do.”

Moderna has promised about 20 million doses of the vaccine to the U.S. by the end of December.

“Healthcare workers have been on the front lines of the fight against the virus and are an inspiration to us all. We look forward to vaccinations of this important population starting this week," Moderna CEO Stephane Bancel said in a statement on Saturday.

Last week, immunizations from the first vaccine from Pfizer and BioNTech began.

Thus far, the first shots from both vaccines will be going to health care workers and residents of long-term care homes.

According to CBN News, the general population will most likely not start immunizations until spring or later.

President-elect Joe Biden said he plans to have 100 million doses distributed in his first 100 days in office.

An expert panel who are working on who will receive shots next will most likely choose essential workers, such as bus drivers, grocery store workers and others.

Other experts, however, say seniors older than 65 should be immunized next and people with certain medical conditions.

How the vaccine will be administered could vary from state to state, CBN News reports.

Both developed vaccines require two doses several weeks apart.

Photo courtesy: ©Getty Images/Manjurul 


Amanda Casanova is a writer living in Dallas, Texas. She has covered news for ChristianHeadlines.com since 2014. She has also contributed to The Houston Chronicle, U.S. News and World Report and IBelieve.com. She blogs at The Migraine Runner.