Too High Parental Aspirations Can Hurt Child's School Performance

Jim Liebelt | Senior Editor of Publications for HomeWord | Thursday, November 19, 2015

Too High Parental Aspirations Can Hurt Child's School Performance

*The following is excerpted from an online article from PsychCentral.

New research from the U.K. suggests parental ambitions can benefit or harm a child’s academic achievement.

If a parent's expectations are realistic, children tend to do better in school. However, if the goals are unrealistic, then the child may not perform well in school.

"Our research revealed both positive and negative aspects of parents’ aspiration for their children’s academic performance. Although parental aspiration can help improve children’s academic performance, excessive parental aspiration can be poisonous," said lead author Kou Murayama, Ph.D., of the University of Reading.

The study was published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology.

Murayama and his colleagues analyzed data from a longitudinal study from 2002 to 2007 of 3,530 secondary school students (49.7 percent female) and their parents in Bavaria, Germany. The study assessed student math achievement as well as parental aspiration (how much they want their child to earn a particular grade) and expectation (how much they believe their child can achieve a certain grade) on an annual basis.

Researchers found that high parental aspiration led to increased academic achievement, but only when it did not overly exceed realistic expectation. When aspiration exceeded expectation, the children’s achievement decreased proportionately.

To reinforce the results, the researchers attempted to replicate the main findings of the study using data from a two-year study of more than 12,000 U.S. students and their parents. The results were similar to the German study and provided further evidence that parents’ overly high aspirations are associated with worse academic performance by their kids.

Previous psychological research has found the association between aspiration and academic achievement, but this study highlights a caveat, said Murayama.

"Much of the previous literature conveyed a simple, straightforward message to parents: Aim high for your children and they will achieve more," said Murayama. "In fact, getting parents to have higher hopes for their children has often been a goal of programs designed to improve academic performance in schools."

Investigators believe the study suggests that the focus of educational programs should not be on blindly increasing parental aspiration but on giving parents the information they need to develop realistic expectations.

Source: PsychCentral