Why Are Men in Turkey Wearing Miniskirts?

Jim Denison | Denison Forum on Truth and Culture | Wednesday, February 25, 2015

Why Are Men in Turkey Wearing Miniskirts?


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Men in Turkey have begun wearing miniskirts in public.  Having been to Turkey numerous times, I can tell you that men there do not typically dress in feminine clothes.  But many are taking part in a protest movement to combat violence against women.  The brutal murder of 20-year-old student Ozgecan Aslan has sparked their outrage.  Using a hashtag which translates to "wear a miniskirt for Ozgecan," Turkish men have begun posting pictures on social media of themselves in miniskirts.

 

You won't see many American men in miniskirts these days—it's too cold outside.  Winter is costing the U.S. at least $5 billion, according to analysts.  Many cities, Boston and New York among them, are on track to have their coldest February in history.  Massachusetts has seen at least 130 roof collapses caused by snow accumulations.  In Dallas we've been iced in for most of the week. 

 

If you want to travel in icy conditions, here's an option: a New Zealand manufacturer has just introduced a wearable jetpack.  He claims that it will fly for 30 minutes at a maximum speed of nearly 46 mph at altitudes of up to 3,000 feet.  For a mere $150,000, you can get one next year.

 

Nervous about flying?  Here's a news item that may help: morning flights are likely to be safer and more tranquil.  The heating of the ground later in the day causes bumpier air.  It's also more likely to thunderstorm in the afternoon.  So you should wear your jetpack for your morning commute, but make other plans for the return trip.

 

Security is in scarce supply these days.  ISIS has kidnapped at least 90 people from Christian villages in Syria, while jihadists continue calling on "lone wolf" terrorists to attack popular sites in America and around the world.  Congressional gridlock could jeopardize funding for the Department of Homeland Security.  Eight people eating in a restaurant in the Czech Republic were killed by a lone gunman yesterday.  And dozens were injured when a Southern California commuter train slammed into a truck and derailed.  Even private restrooms may not be private—a restaurant owner in Maryland is accused of secretly videotaping women using the bathroom.

 

Insecure times are great times for the gospel. (Tweet this) When all is well, people have all of Jesus they want but not all of Jesus they need.  But adversity shows us the folly of self-reliance.  All our money and technology cannot end violence and terrorism or control the weather.

 

What most threatens you today?  You can do all things through Christ who strengthens you (Philippians 4:13).  So name your challenges, trust them to your Father, and ask him for such serenity that your faith will be obvious to others.  And know that God wants to redeem your greatest struggles for his glory and our good. (Tweet this)

 

Catherine Booth, co-founder of the Salvation Army, said of her problems: "The waters are rising, but so am I.  I am not going under, but over."

 

If Jesus is your King, so are you.

 

 

Publication date: February 25, 2015

 

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