Religious Pluralism from the Pulpit

Cal Thomas | Syndicated columnist | Thursday, September 12, 2002

Religious Pluralism from the Pulpit

The Washington Times has, for several years, run excerpts of sermons from Washington area pastors. It is an interesting feature, especially when it reveals the doctrine of some these churches. Last Monday, the Times excerpted a sermon by the new pastor of Foundry Methodist Church, a liberal congregation where the Clintons used to attend.

Next to the sermon, was a little box in which some theological thoughts by the pastor were outlined. He thinks one can find ways to God through the Bible, the Torah and the Koran.

One of the casualties of 9/11 has been this religious pluralism notion that all faiths are co-equal. That is impossible on its face. Each makes claims that cannot be simultaneously true. Judaism says Jesus is not the messiah. Islam says God had no son and that Jesus was not resurrected. The Bible says Jesus is the Son of God and no man comes to the father but by him.

Freedom to express one's religious beliefs is one thing. But when supposedly Christian ministers say that even those faiths that deny the Son of God are equal to the one that proclaims him as God's son, we have a serious problem. I'm Cal Thomas in Washington.